Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Entertain Us (16-5-2017): Shows cancelled too early

DURING the weekend, news broke the sitcom 2 Broke Girls would be cancelled after six seasons of being shown on our screens.

According to my research, it was an ‘unexpected hit’ when it first aired in 2011 but has been cancelled after struggling to get viewers in its more recent seasons.

While I’m not sure it was really a ‘hit’ it certainly gave me pause to consider some shows I believe have been cancelled too early.

Flight of the Conchords
New Zealand-based comedy duo Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement managed to have two seasons of their show aired on American television before it was abruptly cancelled in 2009.
The show was based on a fictional two-man band called Flight of the Conchords, with the two actors playing the two men with whom they shared names.
The show was nominated for six Emmy Awards in its second season and HBO executives wanted a third season, but the creators’ desire to reside in New Zealand and the need for original material made it difficult to continue.
Thankfully, the band released a statement saying “while the characters Bret and Jemaine will no longer be around, the real Bret and Jemaine will continue to exist”.

Arrested Development
Netflix has saved this show, releasing season four in 2013 and commissioning season five, which means someone has seen the light.
Ron Howard’s creation is a brilliant combination of script writing, perfect casting and wonderful acting.
This show didn’t achieve high ratings despite its genius, leaving us to assume the jokes were missed by the vast majority of the viewing population.
My favourite example of this is Will Arnett’s character regularly rolling into scenes on a Segway, and on every such occasion the on-screen conversation changes dramatically. I’m looking forward to the next season of this series.

Deadwood
This series is set in the 1870s in Deadwood, South Dakota, before and after the area’s annexation by the Dakota Territory and follows the growth of the town.
The show only lasted for three seasons, 36 episodes, despite receiving extensive critical acclaim and winning eight Emmy Awards from 28 nominations.
Writer David Milch used actual diaries and newspapers from 1870s Deadwood to ensure the characters, events and aesthetic of the show was authentic.
The show was cancelled by HBO prematurely, with the creators not having the opportunity to wrap up the story and leaving the plot unresolved.

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